Sunday, 29 October 2017

Technical Report (Draft 1)

Background
Singapore is a metropolis city-state without any natural resources and heavily dependent on external trade alliances agreements to bring in natural resources to power up the city. Natural resources have always been the source of conflict between countries due to its scarcity. To overcome this situation, Singapore has been constantly investing on sustainable methods to reduce the usage for natural resource while maintaining the needs to power up the city.

As Singapore continues to prosper, our education system moves towards applied learning that encourages student to utilize technology to expedite on their full learning capability. In result, students have grown to be more dependent on technologies as it has brought comfort and convenience towards daily learning.

Technology has also influences our students to be ignorance to Singapore’s reliance of energy from other countries and the lack of education on energy-conservation that will lead to over consumption of energy, creating a potential threat to our future. While on the other hand, students have the highest influence on both the older and the future generations and by empowering them on energy-conservation will be Singapore’s key in setting future trend in energy conservation.


Problem Statement
Students in SIT should possess basic knowledge on energy conservation techniques to benefit our campus by reducing the energy cost. However, many students lack the knowledge and awareness in terms of energy conservation, and sometimes ignorance to take the simplest action due to personal convenience. Thus, there is a need to raise awareness on energy conversation to students by educating them to reduce the usage of energy and understand climate change.


Purpose Statement
The objective of this report is to propose to SIT community to install a gallery that raises awareness about energy conservation and climate change. The gallery will be self-sustained by solar panels through utilizing the light energy emitted by the sun and converting it into electrical energy to power up the gallery. The gallery will contains information regarding to energy conservation to educate students on the importance of saving energy.


Friday, 13 October 2017

Readers Responses (Draft 3)

According to the article, “Floor lights helps ‘smartphone zombies’ keep eye on the road,” Tan (2017) reported Singaporeans tend to look down on their phones while crossing the road, this post a danger not only to themselves but also the traffic. Hence, Land Transport Authority (LTA) launched an initiative to counter the issue by installing ground Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights at pedestrian crossings. Lee mentioned that LTA picked two high pedestrian volume locations for six months to test for its effectiveness before officially installing it at other places. Lee also further stated that each pair of strips at the crossing stands weighs a hefty price tag of $10,000 to $13,000, making it an expensive investment.

LTA’s initiative to install the ground light might cause the mobile phone users to be over-reliant of this technology. 

First of all, this technology will change the behaviour of people crossing the road in the long term.
Sulleyman (2017) mentioned that "we don't want people to use phones when they're dealing with traffic, even when walking around. People must always look around them, to check if cars actually stopping at the red signals.” If this technology is mass installed island wide, mobile phone users will soon be dependent on the light and will not check on traffic before crossing the road. In the same article, dutch road safety group VVN mentioned that the LED lights will encouraged bad human behaviour. For instance, if the vehicle is not able to stop on time, and pedestrians overlooked the situation, accident maybe detrimental. 

Alternatively, LTA should work towards educating people about the negative consequences of using mobile phones whilst crossing the roads rather than implementing on pricey LED lights along the pedestrian crossings.  In an article, Pakri (2017) stated that “there is no need for LTA to accommodate these “smartphone zombies”. It should be instead discouraged such behaviour on the road”. Pakri (2017) also said “at least deploy officers at pedestrian crossings to caution and educate them”. This idea will work as the ‘smartphone zombies’ will be stopped and be warn about the danger of it.  

As implementing this technology will serve as a short term solution,  LTA should path into educating the citizen through various methods. Based on the article, Chua (2017) reported that road users will get up close with dangerous traffic situations without any risks through the help of Virtual Reality (VR) system. This approach aims the younger generations about the danger of traffic and pedestrian skills. The system requires the users to turn their heads to the left and right like the actual pedestrian crossing setting to look out for vehicles before crossing. This campaign will instil muscles memory to people to watch out for traffic before making the cross. Not only should this campaign target the younger generation, it should also reach out to everyone around the world. Aside from Singapore, other countries are facing the similar issues and they are implementing the LED strips as well. Why not set up campaign to educate all these people from the danger of crossing road with eyes glued to their mobile phones. 

In conclusion, LTA should reassess the need to implement on LED strips on the pedestrian crossings as it is a short-term solution and it will cause people to be over reliance on the lights. Furthermore, the LED strips will bring negative effects such as complacency and harmful learning to the younger generations. Instead of investing on LED strips, the LTA should educate and send messages to people about the consequences of crossing the road blindly. In addition, campaigns can be set up at various crossings with high traffic volume so people like learn more about it.


Poh Shi Lei
12 October 2017


Reference:

Chua, J. (2017, May 26). Road Safety Campaign takes a VR twist. The Todaysonline. Retrieved from 2017, September 26 http://www.todayonline.com/singapore/road-safety-campaign-takes-vr-twist

Pakri, S. (2017, May 15). Educate 'Smartphone Zombies', not accommodate them. The Straits Times. Retrieved from 2017, September 25 
http://www.straitstimes.com/forum/letters-in-print/educate-smartphone-zombies-not-accommodate-them

Titcomb, J. (2017, February 16). Pavement lights installed near Dutch schools to guide smartphone-obsessed pedestrians. The Telegraph. Retrieved from 2017, September 25 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/02/17/pavement-lights-installed-near-dutch-schools-guide-smartphone/

Sulleyman, A. (2017, February 16). The system, called +Lichtlijn, has attracted criticism from the Dutch Traffic Safety Association. Independent. Retrieved from 2017, September 25 http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/traffic-lights-pavement-smartphone-users-look-down-dutch-pedestrians-netherlands-a7584081.html



Sunday, 1 October 2017

Readers Response (Draft 2)

According to the article, “Floor lights helps ‘smartphone zombies’ keep eye on the road,” Tan (2017) reported Singaporeans tend to look down on their phones while crossing the road, this post a danger to themselves and the road. Hence, Land Transport Authority (LTA) launched an initiative to counter the issue by installing ground LED lights at pedestrian crossings. LTA said that it picked two high pedestrian volume locations for six months to test for its effectiveness before officially installing in other places. LTA also further stated that it weighs a hefty price tag of $10,000 to $13,000 for each pair of strips at the crossing stands. Other countries also implemented similar ideas to counter against phone addicts.

LTA’s initiative to install the ground light might cause the mobile phone users to be over-reliance of this situation. 

According to an article, " The system, called +Lichylijin, has attracted criticism from the Dutch Traffic Safety Association" Sulleyman A (2017) mentioned that "we don't want people to use phones when they're dealing with traffic, even when walking around. People must always look around them, to check if cars are actually stopping at the red signals.” If the initiative mass install across the country, mobile phone users will soon be dependent on the light and will not check on traffic before crossing the road. In the same article, dutch road safety group VVN mentioned that it encouraged bad human behaviour. For instance, if the vehicle is not able to stop on time and users overlooked the situation and cross, the accident maybe detrimental. 

Alternatively, LTA should work against educating people about the negative consequences of using mobile phones whilst crossing the roads rather than implementing on pricey LED lights along the pedestrian crossings.  In an article, “Educate ‘smartphone zombies’, not accommodate them” Pakri (2017) stated that “there is no need for LTA to accommodate these “smartphone zombies”. It should be instead discouraged such behaviour on the road”.  The author also said “at least deploy officers at pedestrian crossings to caution and educate them”. This idea will work well as the ‘smartphone zombies’ will be stopped and be warn about the danger of it. 

Based on the article, “Road safety campaign takes a VR twist” Chua (2017) reported that road users will get up close with dangerous traffic situations without any risks through the help of Virtual Reality (VR) system. This approach aims the younger generations about the danger of traffic and pedestrian skills. The system requires the users to turn their heads to the left and right like the actual pedestrian crossing setting to look out for vehicles before crossing. This campaign will instil muscles memory to people to watch out for traffic before making the cross. Not only should this campaign target the younger generation, it should also reach out to everyone around the world. Aside from Singapore, other countries are facing the similar issues and they are implementing the LED strips as well. Why not set up campaign to educate all these people from the danger of crossing road with eyes glued to their mobile phones. 

In conclusion, LTA should reassess the need to implement on LED strips on the pedestrian crossings as it is a short-term solution and it will cause people to be over reliance on the lights. Furthermore, the LED strips will also bring negative effects of complacency and harmful learning to the younger generations. Instead of investing on LED strips, the LTA should educate and send messages to people about the consequences of crossing the road blindly. In addition, campaigns can be set up at various crossings with high traffic volume so people like learn more about it.


Poh Shi Lei
28 September 2017


Reference:
Sulleyman, A. (February, 16 2017). The system, called +Lichtlijn, has attracted criticism from the Dutch Traffic Safety Association. Independent. Retrieved from September, 25 2017 http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/traffic-lights-pavement-smartphone-users-look-down-dutch-pedestrians-netherlands-a7584081.html

Titcomb, J. (February, 16 2017). Pavement lights installed near Dutch schools to guide smartphone-obsessed pedestrians. The Telegraph. Retrieved from September, 25 2017 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/02/17/pavement-lights-installed-near-dutch-schools-guide-smartphone/

Pakri, S. (May, 15 2017). Educate 'Smartphone Zombies', not accommodate them. The Straits Times. Retrieved from September, 26 2017 http://www.straitstimes.com/forum/letters-in-print/educate-smartphone-zombies-not-accommodate-them


Chua, J. (May, 26 2017). Road Safety Campaign takes a VR twist. The Todaysonline. Retrieved from September, 26 2017 http://www.todayonline.com/singapore/road-safety-campaign-takes-vr-twist

Tuesday, 26 September 2017

Readers Response (Draft 1)


In the article, “Floor lights helps ‘smartphone zombies’ keep eye on the road,” Tan (2017) addressed that Singaporeans tend to look down on their phones while crossing the road, this post a danger to themselves and the road. Hence, Land Transport Authority (LTA) launched an initiative to counter the issue by installing ground LED lights at pedestrian crossings. LTA said that it picked two high pedestrian volume locations for six months to test for its effectiveness before officially installing in other places. LTA also further stated that it weighs a hefty price tag of $10,000 to $13,000 of each pair of strips at the crossing stands.

LTA’s initiative to install the ground light will cause the mobile phone users to be over-reliance of this situation. According to an article, Jose de Jong said “We don't want people to use phones when they're dealing with traffic, even when walking around. People must always look around them, to check if cars are actually stopping at the red signals.”  

If the initiative mass installs across the country, mobile phone users will soon be dependent on the ground light and will not check on traffic before crossing the road. Dutch road safety group VVN said “It encouraged bad behaviour”. For instance, if the vehicle is not able to stop on time and users overlooked the situation and cross, the accident maybe detrimental.

Alternatively, LTA should work against educating people about the negative consequences of using mobile phones whilst crossing the roads rather than implementing on pricey LED lights along the pedestrian crossings.  In an article, “Educate ‘smartphone zombies’, not accommodate them” Pakri (2017) stated that “there is no need for LTA to accommodate these “smartphone zombies”. It should be instead discouraged such behaviour on the road”.  The author also said “at least deploy officers at pedestrian crossings to caution and educate them”. This idea will work well as the ‘smartphone zombies’ will be stopped and be warn about the danger of it.

Based on the article, “Road safety campaign takes a VR twist” Chua (2017) stated that road users will get up close with dangerous traffic situations without any risks through the help of Virtual Reality (VR) system. This approach aims the younger generations about the danger of traffic and pedestrian skills. The system requires the users to turn their heads to the left and right like the actual pedestrian crossing setting to look out for vehicles before crossing. This campaign will instil muscles memory to people to watch out for traffic before making the cross.

Not only should this campaign target the younger generation, it should also reach out to everyone around the world. Aside from Singapore, other countries are facing the similar issues and they are implementing the LED strips as well. Why not set up campaign to educate all these people from the danger of crossing road with eyes glued to their mobile phones.

In conclusion, LTA should reassess the need to implement on LED strips on the pedestrian crossings as it is a short-term solution and it will cause people to be over reliance on the lights. Furthermore, the LED strips will also bring negative effects of complacency and harmful learning to the younger generations. Instead of investing on LED strips, the LTA should educate and send messages to people about the consequences of crossing the road blindly. In addition, campaigns can be set up at various crossings with high traffic volume so people like learn more about it.


26 September 2017


Reference:




Technical Report (Draft 1)

Background Singapore is a metropolis city-state without any natural resources and heavily dependent on external trade alliances agreement...